The share of young adults living at home has been rising for decades in the United States. But in the six months since the start of the coronavirus pandemic, the increase has been especially steep.

The share of young adults living at home has been rising for decades in the United States. But in the six months since the start of the coronavirus pandemic, the increase has been especially steep.

Fifty-two percent of 18- to 29-year-olds now live with their parents, compared to 47 percent just before the pandemic, a recent Pew Research Center study found. Many of these young adults are parents themselves, which means more children are living with their grandparents.

“Young adults have been particularly hard hit by this year’s pandemic and economic downturn, and have been more likely to move than other age groups,” according to Pew.

The shuttering of college dorms isn’t responsible for the increase, since dorm residents are classified as living at home anyway.

Back in 1960, when fewer young adults went to college and more of them were financially independent, only 30 percent of 18- to 29-year-olds resided with their parents. Since then, it has become increasingly common for young adults to live at home.

This is the first time in recorded history that the majority of young adults have lived at home. At the start of the Great Depression, in 1930, the share was 43 percent. By the end of the Depression, it had risen to 48 percent.