They’ve lost their daughters, but they’re finding their grandkids

Thousands of young activists, including hundreds of pregnant women, were kidnapped by the military dictatorship that ruled Argentina from 1976 to 1983.

Most of the captives were killed immediately, but the pregnant women were kept alive until they’d given birth. Then they were killed and the babies given to families loyal to the regime.

But their grandmothers were determined to find them.

“These predators thought that we women were weak, and that we were going to stay at home crying in fear,” says Estela de Carlotto, 84, in a video produced recently by The New York Times. Estela’s pregnant daughter, Laura, was kidnapped in 1977 and murdered the next year.

“They were wrong.”

Over the years, Estela and the group she leads, the Grandmothers of the Plaza de Mayo, have found more than 115 of their lost grandchildren.

And just recently, she found her own grandson, a 37-year-old musician who’d always wondered if he was adopted.

“When I found my grandson and could hug him … I knew that in his blood was my daughter Laura.”

“And it was like I got her back.”

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